Why the Death of Lisa McPherson Matters to Me

From: "Jeffrey Liss" <[email protected]>
Subject: Why the Death of Lisa McPherson Matters to Me
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2000 16:47:28 -0500

There are few if any critics on ARS who knew Lisa McPherson personally. Perhaps some who knew her lurk here, too frightened to speak. Had she survived her forcible detention at the Ft. Harrison Hotel, it is doubtful any of us would even know her name. Who knows: had she not died, perhaps she would have continued as a member of the church to which she devoted 13 years of her life. What, then, gives us the right to use her name, her face, and the story of her tragic death in furtherance of a cause she herself may not have supported? Lisa McPherson was not a martyr in the usual sense. She did not die for her faith but as a result of it. Her death came not by choice and not as a result of religious persecution. She died -- literally -- in the arms of her church. She offered Scientology her devotion. It, in return, made her its victim. We expect a religion to raise the human condition, to lift both its adherents and society as a whole. It is entirely within our purview to question those religions and religious practices which have the opposite effect. Simply because a belief system wraps itself in the protective cloak of faith does not mean it escapes public scrutiny. The moment Scientology's "tech" or "ethics" diminsh the humanity of a church member, the veil of secrecy must be torn away and the danger exposed. Lisa's breakdown on November 18, 1995 was a crisis of faith, born in the realization that "the most ethical group of people on the planet" had taken advantage of her generosity and her quest for spirituality in order to make a quick buck. It was an epiphany so demoralizing that it broke her heart. Scientology's problem was that Lisa's crisis shouldn't be happening. She had become living proof that the "tech" didn't work. She had become a liability. Scientology's solution was a 17 day assault on her humanity. Lisa didn't simply die, life was pounded out of her by the relentless indifference of her handlers. The church maintains that they genuinely cared for her, but day after day they chose "tech" over compassion. They held scientology "ehtics" higher than Lisa's humanity. She begged for help. They watched her die. I occasionally write letters for Amnesty International, as do others in ARS. Is the plight of refugees or the unjustly imprisoned in some far off land any business of ours? Of course it is! They are called "human rights" for a reason. We are all entitled to them; we must all be vigilant in the cause of their protection. Lisa's rights are my rights -- no greater, no less. The fact that they were violated in a hotel room 3000 miles away from my home in no way diminishes the insult or the harm done to me -- done to us all. What gives us the right to invoke Lisa's name? Humanity -- ours and hers. We invoke her name as a reminder to Scientology that we are witnesses to her life and the manner of her death. We hold up her image as a warning to Scientology that we are watching. We tell her story to educate others -- so that no one else will die as she did: deluded, degraded, and destroyed by a cult that found it easier to let her die than admit its inability to help her. "No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee." -- John Donne, "For Whom the Bell Tolls"


From: [email protected] (Rod Keller)
Date: 15 Feb 2000 02:12:30 GMT
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Jeffrey Liss ([email protected]) wrote:
: What gives us the right to invoke Lisa's name? Humanity -- ours and
: hers. We invoke her name as a reminder to Scientology that we are
: witnesses to her life and the manner of her death. We hold up her
: image as a warning to Scientology that we are watching. We tell her
: story to educate others -- so that no one else will die as she did:
: deluded, degraded, and destroyed by a cult that found it easier to let
: her die than admit its inability to help her.
Sorry to snip, but this paragraph really spoke to me. I was asked by a reporter at one of the Clearwater press conferences "Mike Rinder claims that Lisa McPherson is just a symbol to you, is that true?" I replied "Yes, I think that's accurate." She is a symbol to me of all the abuses of Scientology, not the first, not the last, just the best documented. -- Rod Keller / [email protected] / Irresponsible Publisher
Black Hat #1 / Expert of the Toilet / CWPD Mouthpiece / Killer Rod
The Lerma Apologist / Merchant of Chaos / Vision of Destruction
Bigot of Mystery / OSA Patsy / Quasi-Scieno / Mental Bully

From: "Alec" <[email protected]>
Subject: I knew Lisa (was: Why the Death of Lisa McPherson Matters to Me
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2000 21:02:17 -0600
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Jeffrey Liss wrote in message
<[email protected]>...
>There are few if any critics on ARS who knew Lisa McPherson
>personally.
I knew Lisa. Before me she bought Scientology hook, line, and sinker. She made the ultimate step that even I had hoped to make--to join the Sea Org, fully believing that the glaze in their eyes was a sign of unwavering devotion to liberating mankind. Lisa's devotion was instrumental in my own dedication to the ultimate step in COS. Lisa practiced Scientology with the determination and the TR's of a highly trained auditor, though I don't know her training level. Having accepted the premise that aberration held us blinded and that Scientology clearing would enlighten, Lisa stood impressively in the dedicated manner of a Bodhisatva--one who foregoes his/her own salvation in order to provide it to others. She WAS a role model who influenced others already near the edge of the abyss of total blind acceptance of Hubbard's Glassbead Game. Her countenance of devotion made you ache with a burning desire to give your life to that game. We never had a clue to the deception in which we moved, lived, and had our being. She applied Scieno-Tech to me in a way I knew it should be applied--flawlessly. But unknown to me she went one further and allowed that the RPEC was merely a trap set by Hubbard to attribute all wrong practices and mispractices of Scientology to ancient wrong-doings by the errant parishioner. It was extremely important for the survival of Scientology that all apparent mistakes in the Tech be blamed on the one who questioned it--and that is the function of the RPEC (Repair of Past Ethics Conditions) which lasts for the shortest of 1) eternity, or 2) the earliest remembered wrongdoing (usually thousands of lifetimes ago). Most members, rather than continue the process for eternity, are quite ready to settle for a quickly "remembered" wrong-doing that he/she committed much more recently (a more recent past life). Of course the rate of $3000.00 per course of processing extended through eternity would amount to a lot of hamburgers. One might consider he would never again enjoy a burger unless he found a quick self-condemning past ethics outness. But Lisa allowed that I might simply 'not' have committed a prior wrong-doing that was responsibile for the obstacle considered. Even in her total acceptance she transcended the "Tech" and brought the cycle to a quick end. And for that, COS declared her and invoked the ultimate Scientology Ostracism--a Scientology penal system sentence (the RPF). Two years later, as persistent a believer as ever, Lisa counseled me to persist in my engagement with my fiance (even after COS (Celebrity Center, Int'l) implied to me that my fiance was an evil and psychotic person (SP). Me and Lisa... two devoted fools who would follow Scientology to our demise. Luckily for me the sham snapped me out of the hypnosis. I wish I could have slapped Lisa's face during her episode at the accident site where she experienced her psychosis. I didn't and 17 days later her death was partly on my hands. >Perhaps some who knew her lurk here, too frightened to
>speak.
No I've never been frightened to speak out, but as every Scientologist knows, all this speaking out has the apparent effect of resolving the injustice for us, and eventually each of us runs down, the injustice apparently resolved as a lie layered on top of the original injustice. >Had she survived her forcible detention at the Ft. Harrison
>Hotel, it is doubtful any of us would even know her name.
Nope. I would remember her forever. Her eyes had mirrored for me my own succumb to the coercion and "Chinese-School"-engrained adherence to the Tech from hell. >Who knows:
>had she not died, perhaps she would have continued as a member of the
>church to which she devoted 13 years of her life. What, then, gives
>us the right to use her name, her face, and the story of her tragic
>death in furtherance of a cause she herself may not have supported?
I took the license to do so because I could. That was one small measure by which I could come to immense cause over the harmful destructive Church of Scientology and it's incestuous founder, Ron Hubbard. >Lisa McPherson was not a martyr in the usual sense. She did not die
>for her faith but as a result of it. Her death came not by choice and
>not as a result of religious persecution. She died -- literally -- in
>the arms of her church. She offered Scientology her devotion. It, in
>return, made her its victim.
In a moment of despair I might also have become a victim--a charred body by which my children would have remembered the effect Scientology had on their father. As fate had it, I endured the nightmare of "exit psychosis" and had to grapple with decoding the deception. Now seven years later I can hardly call myself a survivor of that holocaust, a chagrinned and defeated victim (receipt point of a wrongful act by a suppressor). stripped of my childrens' fortune. I decided long ago, I'm not too proud to apply a dictionary definition (victim) to my own plight. That implant has covered up many of Scientology's horror story wrong-doings. -David Alexander (Alec)